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To AI, or not to AI: A Review of Max Tegmark’s book “Life 3.0—Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence”

What’s that old saying, “Careful what you wish for.” In my last post, I took a look at Robert Sapolsky’s 2017 book entitled Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst. I concluded my post by stating: “Sapolsky never really mentions the digital age. To say the least, the digital age has the […]

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REVIEW: Robert Sapolsky’s “Behave” Suffers From “Flotationism”

I thoroughly enjoyed neurologist and primatologist Robert Sapolsky’s 2017 book entitled Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst. I’m not new to Sapolsky’s work. A number of years ago (when VHS tapes ruled the world) I watched a class of his through Great Courses entitled Biology and Human Behavior. To say that […]

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QUICK LOOK: Harari on the History of Attachment

Lately I’ve been blogging about the work of world history professor Yuval Harari, specifically his two books Sapiens and Homo Deus. I found Sapiens by browsing at a local bookstore just up the road. As I flipped through the pages of Sapiens, my eye caught a glimpse of a picture from one of Harry Harlow’s […]

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Cultural Cognitive Models Now—Settling the Fight Between Humanism and Post-liberalism

In the past four months or so, I have read five books that seem to circle the same debate: humanism versus post-humanism or post-liberalism. Honestly, I did not set out to investigate this debate; it just happened. In one case, an author was so biased that I was motivated to read a book that countered […]

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The Patriarchy is Dead; Long Live the Patriarchy (Legacy)

I try to find authors who will challenge my view of the world, and my knowledge of it, in new and different ways. Science historian David Wooten did not disappoint. Wooten wrote the 2015 book entitled The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution. Wooten’s main premise really caught my attention: Before […]

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